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As clueless Jonathan runs APC aground in Ekiti  (26/06/2014) The Ekitis: Their votes, their minds  (26/06/2014)
Expect more peaceful elections in 2015, says AIG  (26/06/2014) LG council creation, plot against Fayose, says Bamidele  (26/06/2014)
The graceful governor  (26/06/2014) How Ekiti workers, others deceived Fayemi with endorsements  (26/06/2014)
Ekiti guber poll: Good for democracy Ahmed  (26/06/2014) Fayose gets certificate of return today  (26/06/2014)
My wife is fond of having men friends, separate us  (25/06/2014) Ekiti election not like June 12- Kokori  (25/06/2014)

As clueless Jonathan runs APC aground in Ekiti   Back To Top

From: Nigerian Tribune      Published on: Thursday, June 26, 2014

John Ainofenokhai

Fayose is a son of a bitch. Yes, he is our son of a bitch.THE above statements came from an exchange between two users on a social network medium to express their opinions on the outcome of the Ekiti governorship election, which Ayodele Fayose of the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) emphatically won. As inappropriate as their language may sound, nobody can capture what has just happened in Ekiti State any better. Yes, Fayose, the PDP candidate went into that election trusting only one thing: the efficacy of democracy in guaranteeing the popular will. He was insulted, called names, denigrated and had his reputation dragged in the mud by the ruling All Progressives Congress (APC) and its supporters, especially in the media. He was portrayed by the APC and a good section of the elite in the South-West as a bad dream that should not be allowed to come to pass. And when all that failed, propaganda was ignited that a court judgment had barred the PDP candidate from the election.

It was all too clear that the emergence of Fayose as the PDP governorship candidate in Ekiti State had thrown the APC into confusion. Their natural response was to hit the panic button by threatening violence, thunder and brimstone in what should simply be a peaceful process for the enlightened people of the state to decide on their collective fate. Thus, speaking at his investiture as the Chancellor of Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomosho, the APC leader, Bola Tinubu, had called on his supporters to unleash mayhem should there be any other outcome other than his partys victory in Ekiti and Osun governorship elections. According to the APC chieftain, it will be rig and roastwe are prepared, not to go to court but to drive you out. We will not take it anymore. If you mess up in Ekiti and Osun states, you will see our reactions. For every action, there must be a reaction.

Interestingly, the people of Ekiti State on Saturday shunned Tinubu and his APC war chants to embrace the democratic principle of one man, one vote. Thus, that morning, with the reassuring presence of security operatives, which President Goodluck Jonathan had promised, the voters in Ekiti were confident enough to turn out in large numbers to cast their votes for the candidate of their choice after what was largely a heated campaign period largely coloured by the melodrama and infantile pretensions of some APC governors. So, rather than the war declaration of the APC, the Ekiti election was very peaceful and the conduct, exemplary. There were no reports of ballot box snatching or stuffing and neither were there allegations of the same. Indeed as Dan Nwanyanwu, the national chairman of the Labour Party, whose candidate, Opeyemi Bamidele, participated in the ballot, put it, this is the best election that INEC has ever organised in the country. And credit must go to the military and other security agencies for confining troublemakers to their hotel rooms where they were quartered and giving the people a peaceful ambience to exercise their right of choice.

While the PDP and the governor-elect, Fayose savour this moment of victory, the sterling performance, which INEC displayed in delivering the Ekiti election, deserves commendation. After the 2011 general elections for which Professor Atahiru Jega and his INEC were lauded, they followed it up in Edo and Ondo states respectively. But in Anambra just recently, the election management body was heavily criticised for somewhat shoddy handling of the election process.

However, the way INEC has responded with its transparent handling of every step in the entire process of the Ekiti election hints of an institution that appropriates criticisms positively for improved performance. More than anything else, INECs performance in Ekiti naturally has increased public confidence in the electoral process as a vehicle for delivering popular will.

As one of the most important indices of democracy, periodic elections are the best vehicle for vertical accountability in self-restraining systems. In other words, elections remain the chief means by which citizens control what their government does. They serve the purpose of rewarding a performing administration with a new mandate or removing a bad government by voting it out of power. But all these would have amounted to nothing without an unbiased umpire, which the INEC has proved to be. It is important also to note that President Jonathan, by showing his hand early as a democrat, has given INEC the courage to exercise its critical independence. That has never been the character of INEC under past administrations.

The lesson in the outcome of the Ekiti election is there for all to learn. First, democracy is a rule-governed system. Once there are no infractions on the rules, the result is always acceptable to both the victor and the vanquished. Second, democracy is about suasion and popular choice. It is about the people and the people alone. It does not matter how well-meaning and eloquent a candidate might be, its all down to popular choice. Fayose might be a son of a bitch but Ekiti people are saying that he is their son of a bitch.

Those who think that the 2015 general elections are ominous for the continued existence of our country can take the Ekiti election as an irrepressible metaphor for what is to come. All the threats of rig and roast and the baboon and the monkey will be soaked in their own blood petered out into an anti-climax. What is needed is for the political parties to improve on their internal democracy so as to produce credible and popular candidates through competitive and transparent primaries. This is where the APC lost it. Whereas the APC characteristically did not even want to discuss the issue of primaries in Ekiti thus shutting out an asset like Opeyemi Bamidele, PDP rejected the temptations of a consensus candidate that most probably would have eliminated a popular choice like Fayose.

President Jonathan deserves the credit for insisting on this competitive primary in Ekiti for his party and followed it up by providing a secured ambience for the election to hold. And yet in another deft move, the President quickly moved in to quell the internal acrimonies that resulted from the PDP primaries. That was simply how a clueless Jonathan routed the savvy APC in Ekiti. Is this a sign of what is to come in 2015?

Ainofenokhai, a public affairs commentator, contributed this piece from Benin City, Edo State.

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The Ekitis: Their votes, their minds   Back To Top

From: Nigerian Tribune      Published on: Thursday, June 26, 2014

Jide Oguntoye

RECORDING a fresh victory over election rigging, the Independent National Electoral Commission, (INEC), has just concluded the governorship election in Ekiti State, where it has proved that its new voting system could impose calmness and order on prospectively restless and volatile voters.
The Jegas electoral dose has clearly revealed the true nature and characteristics of the Ekitis as a people, for those who may care to know; and such should interest the potential leaders of the state.

Because the INECs new election process has been so transparent, giving no room for grievances and protests at the polling units up to the collation centres, the energies that would have been expended contesting and countering manipulations were saved to give room for deep-rooted search into the minds of the majority of the Ekitis.
Before now, strict adherence to principles and beliefs was one attribute of the Ekitis but never had it been known that the Ekitis would jettison conscientious pursuance of structural transformation of their environments and zealous general development of their state for sheer love of mere change of batons at the governors office.
One had always thought that the Ekitis, with their rugged back-ground, would even be ready to make sacrifices to ensure that the visible, celebrated performances of a government continue rather than dump it to take a fresh risk with the steadiness of such progress.

It had become clear shortly before, during and after the election of June 21 in Ekiti State that the votes of the day were not going to be mere partisan votes but largely protest votes, and you should want to wonder what the Ekitis were protesting so seriously about.
The senior cadres in the civil service of the State had nursed some grievances against not being carried along by their governor which could be a displeasure at watching the governor plug some leakages in the funding of the obviously ambitious state which however suffers lean purse.
The workers in the junior cadres had also waited for some promotions until the government had to affect same close to the election to thus infuriate the workers who felt being merely baited to vote.

There was a young musician-voter who disclosed that the local musicians had a grouse which they had decided to settle with votes; they were unhappy that they, who had made jingles for the governors second term campaign, were however not preferred to musicians from outside Ekiti for the governors campaign rallies!!!
Such were the rather personal or innocuous issues which had added up to sink the governors giant image as a patriotic, celebrated performer; as a builder of roads, as an initiator of Social Security stipends to the elderlies, as a massive renovator of dilapidated schools and hospitals, as a provider of laptops to secondary school students, as a provider of free health care, as a sponsor of community projects, builder of modern markets, promoter of tourism, provider of pipe-borne water, bore-holes, transformers and solar lights as the case might be, as provider of jobs, as promoter of beatification of Ado-Ekiti, as a governor who religiously completed his predecessors projects, etc.
One had heard even his critics admit that he performed but that he had to go to allow some others benefit in governance.

Judging from the past, perhaps JKF would have scaled through if Jega had not introduced his new solution; if polling units were open to manipulations, of which all politicians were guilty.
Maybe JKFs defeat would have been worse if it were in such past when ballot boxes were snatched at gun points and stuffed with thumb-printed ballot papers for counting.
Perhaps Prof. Jega should receive the biggest accolade for the success of the Ekiti State guber poll for restricting voting to physically present humans as against the ghosts and for effectively barring multiple voting.

INECs preparation for elections in Ekiti State in future should be less cumbersome while political parties are likely to know the true numerical strength of their admirers, just as it would happen in the other states of the federation as soon as they also swallow the new electoral pill of INEC.
With Fayemis plight today, whoever wins election as governor in Ekiti State, henceforth would probably work as if there is no second term as he could bore the electorate within the period of four years, however, impressively he performs. Free and fair election has taught us this resoundingly.
Such governor may have to choose between pleasing the workers and embarking on developmental projects or balance both as much as possible, in view of the low income of the state.
Interestingly, the next four years will soon be a story to tell, once again, in Ekiti State and we should all be eager to hear it.
One would think it is important that the good works in Ekiti State should truly continue under the PDP.
That is the way the state would be seen to have also won, just as the PDP won the June 21 election resoundingly.

Oguntoye writes from Oye-Ekiti, Ekiti State.

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Expect more peaceful elections in 2015, says AIG   Back To Top

From: Punch      Published on: Thursday, June 26, 2014

by Sesan Olufowobi

The Assistant Inspector General of Police in charge of security in the Ekiti State governorship election, Ballah Nasarawa, says elections in Nigeria could only get better.

He said the police had got their acts right and assured Nigerians of more peaceful environment in the 2015 general elections.

A statement in Lagos on Wednesday said the AIG, who reviewed the Ekiti State election, added, On behalf of the Inspector-General of Police, I wish to emphatically state that the standard witnessed in the conduct of a peaceful and orderly Ekiti State Governorship election 2014, should be considered as a demonstration of the commitment and readiness of the Nigeria Police Force in ensuring the conduct of a very peaceful, credible and acceptable 2015 general elections in our country.

The police boss, who also heads the Zone 9 Police Command, declared that there was no hanky panky in Ekiti State.

He warned those who he said might want to cause disorderliness in the state after the election to have a rethink.

He said, Those individuals or group of people in Ekiti State who plan to disrupt public peace in any part of the state are hereby warned to desist or else face the full wrath of the law.

The police are still around and are not in a hurry to leave Ekiti State. So the state remains much secured even in this post-election period.

The AIG explained that to make the election peaceful, the police, on the orders of the Inspector-General of Police, deployed their officials in the state, comprising Police Mobile Force, Special Protection Units, Counter Terrorism Units, Anti-Bomb Squad, the Air Wing and the K9 section, among others.

Our proactive approach in ensuring adequate security for the conduct of the election made it practically impossible for hoodlums or criminals to break the law or violate the electoral process, he added.

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LG council creation, plot against Fayose, says Bamidele   Back To Top

From: National Mirror      Published on: Thursday, June 26, 2014

by ABIODUN NEJO

The candidate of Labour Party, LP, in last Saturdays governorship election in Ekiti State, Opeyemi Bamidele, has described Governor Kayode Fayemis intention to create more local governments after his defeat, as an attempt to set the people against the in-coming administration.

Bamidele said for Fayemi to have mooted the idea of creating more local governments at the twilight of his administration, and after losing to the Peoples Democratic Party, PDP, candidate, Ayodele Fayose, who would assume office on October 16, confirmed that the governor was insensitive to the plights of Ekiti people.

Fayemi had, on Tuesday after receiving a report from the Local Government Creation Committee, chaired by a retired High Court Judge, Akin Ajakaye, which recommended the creation of additional Local Council Development Areas, LCDAs from the existing 16 local government areas, said the process would be concluded before the expiration of his administration.

But Bamidele, in a statement in Ado-Ekiti yesterday by his media aide, Ahmed Salami, said he expected the out-going governor, at this critical time, to concentrate his energy on how to combat the rising wave of youth unemployment in the state, rather than trying to create unnecessary impediment for the coming administration.

The federal lawmaker said that Fayemi would do a great disservice to the state if he carried out the policy when he knew that he had already incurred N25bn debt for the succeeding government to defray.

The purported resolve of Governor Fayemi to create more local governments in the twilight of his administration is ill-timed and he has to forget about it if he truly means well for Ekiti and its development.

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The graceful governor   Back To Top

From: Daily Sun      Published on: Thursday, June 26, 2014

By Our Reporter

Just about a week to the gubernatorial elections in Ekiti State, I encountered a top Northern politician from Borno State. He was in Abuja for the National Convention of the All Progressives Congress (APC), which held that weekend. We met at the residence of another prominent Northern politician, who is of the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP). I was struck first by their frank and uninhibited exchanges on political issues despite their different political affiliations.

The APC stalwart had come to pay homage to his long-standing political ally. Their membership of opposite and opposing political parties has not alienated them. The APC chieftain freely shared his experiences at his partys national convention with us. It did not matter to him that PDP and non-PDP members alike were there. There was no inhibition about that because, for him, political parties are mere platforms whose membership should not tear friends and associates apart. He told me that he and our host had been friends for years and would remain so, PDP or APC notwithstanding. I admired his candour and forthrightness. I imagined a situation where the rest of the political flock in Nigeria would be as free-minded as he is. That will certainly make our politics less acrimonious.

In the course of our interaction, the discussion, somehow, veered off into Ekiti. The election was at hand and watchers of our polity had every reason to make predictions and permutations. We adduced different reasons we thought that Ayo Fayose of the PDP would carry the day. But our man from Borno did not quite have an opnion on the matter. He simply concurred by noting that Kayode Fayemi, the Governor of Ekiti State and candidate of the APC, does not look tough and does not act tough. He anchored his concurrence on this impression of Fayemi. He was of the belief that the mans softness could rob him of his quest for reelection. Nobody insisted on anything on the matter. The issue was just an aside and we dismissed it as such.

Bookmakers may have been right or wrong in their analyses of and predictions about the Ekiti situation before the elections. But the fact before us now is that Governor Fayemi has lost to Fayose. And since this uncommon happening took place, another layer of analyses has begun. The polity is agog with the upset in Ekiti. That should, really, be expected. Defeating an incumbent in Nigeria is a very big issue. It is momentous. It does not take place often and, when it does, commentators, analysts and keen watchers of the polity hardly get tired of discussing it.

But what is remarkable about the Ekiti scenario is not that an incumbent has been defeated. It is the grace, which the loser has brought to bear on the development. Unlike what obtains in situations where elections are won and lost, Ekiti has presented us with a different scenario. Fayemi, who lost in spite of his incumbency, is not complaining. He has not accused anybody of manipulation. He is not crying foul. He has not invented reasons or scenarios to justify or explain away his loss. He sees the outcome of the election as the will of the people of Ekiti State freely expressed through their votes. And without waiting for political turn-coats to come with their weird conspiracy theories, the governor immediately congratulated Fayose and invited him over to Government House for frank talks on how Ekiti could be made better. Both the governor and the governor-elect have agreed to work together. There will be no litigations of any sort. The outcome is not a matter for the courts. The winner and the loser are rubbing minds. Indeed, their expressions of solidarity have left many gaping. Many do not seem to believe what they are seeing. It does not fit into the mould of Nigerian politicians and their politics. That is rare sportsmanship at work. With the Fayemi disposition, Ekiti has remained peaceful and both the winner and the loser are the happier for it.

It is right to give kudos to Fayemi in all of this. I have not really met the man at close quarters. But the impression I have of him is that he is a decent man. He is not a politician in the typical and corrupted Nigerian sense. It is almost axiomatic that people engage in politics in Nigeria merely for personal gain. But Fayemi seems to epitomise the classical definition, which sees the politician, as one who engages in politics for the purpose of fashioning out the techniques of civil government. Fayemi is not a member of the Machiavellian breed, who see politics as an end in itself. If he were, he would rake up muck over his loss. He would allege intimidation and arm-twisting. He would instigate his supporters to go violent. He would raise a lot of thorny issues, which his opponent would be bound to respond to. All of this would have charged up the Ekiti polity and eventually throw the state into confusion. But as a good-spirited politician, Fayemi recognises that there is life after public office. He knows that power is transient and should, therefore, not be pursued with reckless abandon.

Again, as a developed mind, I know that Fayemi understands the importance of the verdict of history. Ekiti people elected him governor for four years. By the time he serves out his tenure, he would have entered the history books, as one of the people, who served Ekiti as governor. History will also record whatever he did or failed to do while in office. If he spends another four years, there is no guarantee that he will come out cleaner or better in the eyes of history. In public office, it is not how long but how well. Fayemi came in like a meteor. He has quickly taken his turn and he is getting set to leave. History will respect him, as one who refused to toy with crisis in a land that is crisis-prone. History will also reserve a respectable place for him, as a man, who effortlessly toed the path of honour in a clime where honour is in very short supply.

By his action, Fayemi has also clipped the flapping wings of his party, the APC. The party is given to howls. It makes a lot of populist pretensions. These traits may not be ingrained in the party. But its publicity wing has given it this coloration. Typically, the APC would have feasted on Fayemis loss had the governor not taken an early and decisive stand on the outcome of the election. Such disputations would have been unhelpful. The governor chose the path of maturity and that has enthroned peace in Ekiti and in the mind of the governor. Enjoy your peace, the graceful governor.

The APC should learn one or two lessons from the action of Fayemi. Party politics must be approached with an open mind. It is not war. It is a mere clash of ideology, which should be resolved by the preferences of the electorate. And when the electorate so decide, the political actors should be large-hearted enough to accommodate the outcome of such decisions. This is the main lesson to learn from the Ekiti scenario.

The lesson learnt should also open the eyes of the APC in other ways. It simply tells a lot of story about its possible fortunes or misfortunes in 2015. The APC, no doubt, is a formidable opposition party. But as I have always noted, it should play less to the gallery and deal more with issues that will endear it to the people. PDP-bashing should not really be its preoccupation. PDP should carry its can if it fails to govern well. The concern of APC should be on how it can provide a viable alternative.

Besides, with the loss of one of its core states, the APC must redouble its effort in the quest to wrest power from PDP at the centre. The loss of Ekiti is coming at a very dicey stage in the present political order. With the two major parties in the country, jostling for political control, the fallout from Ekiti may confer an automatic advantage on the PDP. With clearly over 20 states under the control of the ruling party, the APC has a lot of catching up to do.

The situation is not helped by the outcome of its just concluded national convention. The honeymoon, which many of the leaders of the party enjoyed, has rudely been terminated by the way the convention went. Some of the leaders could not get what they wanted. Their ideals have collapsed. They are now aggrieved and have retreated into their shells. That was why they boycotted the inauguration of the newly elected national executive of the party. The leadership of the party may do well to appease them before their anger boils over. Simply put, the party must close ranks if it must arrest the slide that has begun.

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How Ekiti workers, others deceived Fayemi with endorsements   Back To Top

From: Daily Sun      Published on: Thursday, June 26, 2014

By CHARLES ADEGBITE, ADO-EKITI

Education makes a people easy to lead but difficult to drive; easy to govern but impossible to enslave. These were the words of Lord Henry Peter Brougham, the Lord Chancellor of Great Britain, who lived between 1778 and 1868.

This statement aptly explained the outcome of the governorship election of Saturday, June 21 in Ekiti State and the electoral decision taken by the people against their governor, Dr. Kayode Fayemi, who had been in the saddle since October 16, 2010.

A lot of Nigerians, especially those not resident in Ekiti, have been wondering why the electorate massively voted against the governor in spite of his achievements, which are indeed, many. In fact, from the moment the final result was announced, journalists in Ekiti State had begun to receive frantic telephone calls. And the questions everybody was asking were the same: How come Fayemi could not win even a single local government area out of the 16 in the state? Was the election rigged?

Yet, the elections were devoid of violence or rigging. Local journalists and others, who had covered the election stormed the Correspondents Chapel of the Nigeria Union of Journalists (NUJ) in Ado-Ekiti that Sunday morning after the result had been announced. They affirmed that there was nothing like rigging. It was peaceful, free and fair. No snatching of ballot boxes, no delay in the delivery of boxes and other voting materials throughout all the 16 local government areas. The Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) officials arrived on time at their polling units at the right time.

There were even more questions from Nigerians that could not believe that a sitting governor could be so massively defeated. What happened then? Are they saying the man did not perform? What is their problem? With all the huge crowds that have been attending his mega rallies, which we all saw on television and in the newspapers, are you saying the man could not even win a local government area? Not even his local government?

But it is not only Fayemi that was defeated in his local government area. His deputy, Professor Modupe Adelabu, was defeated in her ward in Ado Ekiti. The Secretary to the State Government, Alhaji Ganiyu Owolabi, was defeated in his base; the Chief of Staff to the governor, Yemi Adaramodu was defeated in his area; all the Senators and House of Representatives members lost in their local government areas and some even lost in their polling units. In fact, it was gathered that former governor, Chief Olusegun Oni, was the only one, who voted for the All Progressives Congress (APC) in his polling unit.

So, what could have been responsible for this terrible defeat? Three factors have been cited by informed analysts in the state.

There was an internal crisis within the APC and those who saw the problem coming were suppressed and eventually kicked out of the party. Those ones began to work against the party. There were lots of grumblings within the party, and many of the commissioners had complained at various times of being financially stifled, lamenting that they could not render any help to many of those seeking help from them. Everything was centralised around the governor and his close aides, according to them.

Another reason was the glaring disconnect with the people. The then PDP governorship candidate, Ayodele Fayose, right from his days as governor, had been close to the common man. He has no problem, sharing roasted plantain or corn with the commoner in the streets of Ado-Ekiti or Itapa-Ekiti. He freely associates with the commercial motorcycle riders and drivers, which earned him assorted appellations from the elite in the state. Fayemi, on the other hand, was not of a similar stock. He is seen as belonging to the elite class.

But funny enough, those people dont vote during election. They often stay indoors, watching television while the downtrodden and common men, who are fully in love with Fayose because he identifies with them queue up to vote. All the civil servants, teachers, local government workers, students and artisans, who have direct access to Fayose see him as a man of the people while they see Fayemi as the bourgeoisie governor, an Ekiti-based principal told the reporter.

Mr. Jide Adegbemi, a lawyer in Ado-Ekiti, while analysing the current political realities in the state, also informed: By the time the real campaign started, and Fayemis supporters were singing Koduro soke (let him stay up), the people said, now that the governor has started building a Government House on the hill, if we give him a second chance, he would now be very far from the people and no one would be able to see him. So, whenever his supporters were singing, JKF: Koduro soke, the ordinary man would say, e ta ni rubber, ko jabo sIsan. What that means is, if hes staying up, shoot a catapult at him and bring him down to Isan-Ekiti, his hometown.

But most people in the state would agree that a number of factors actually marked the beginning of the end of his tenure. One was the way he handled the Teachers Development Need Assessment (TDNA) crisis in 2012, an issue that dragged all the way to 2013. He also had issues with local government workers, students of Ekiti State University (EKSU), judiciary workers, health workers, pensioners, commercial motorbike operators, the Road Transport Employers Association of Nigeria (RTEAN), and others.

All these people have families who are aware of their complaints against the governor. So, when he began to buy buses for the associations and unions this year, and the people were aware that the election was coming in a few months, they were just looking at him, wondering how the governor thought they could be so easily deceived. And instead of showing any grievance, they too started hailing him and chorusing: JKF: Koduro soke. Each union and professional association began to tell their members that they should endorse him so that they could get their own dividend of democracy, said a union leader who pleaded that his name should not be mentioned.

More annoying, especially to teachers was the governors complaint that the state was not rich enough to pay the 27 per cent Teachers Pecuniary Allowance (TPA) while he was busy buying exotic cars and sport utility vehicles for traditional rulers across the state. Then when the election was less than a month and he approved the 27 per cent allowance, the teachers told themselves that this governor probably thought that they were foolish. So, they too decided to go to the Oluyemi Kayode Stadium to deceive him and affirm that they were for him.

Of course, all these people are from different local government areas. And on the Friday before the election, the workers, especially teachers and local government employees, gave themselves an unofficial holiday, fully determined to vote out Fayemi and give their votes to Fayose. Early on the day of election, teachers and local government workers began to send text messages to one another on the need for them not to forget their decision to vote Fayemi out. They said the governor would deal with them if he got a second chance as governor.

It was like a hurricane. If you like, you may call it a revolt, because never in the history of Ekiti State has any incumbent governor lost so massively. That is the truth that many people outside the state do not know, Adegbemi said.

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Ekiti guber poll: Good for democracy Ahmed   Back To Top

From: Daily Sun      Published on: Thursday, June 26, 2014

By LAYI OLANREWAJU, Ilorin

Kwara State Governor, Alhaji Abdulfatah Ahmed, has described the outcome of the Ekiti State governorship election won by Mr. Ayodele Fayose as a positive development and an indication that democracy is on course in the country.

Ahmed, who stated this in a congratulatory message to the governor-elect of Ekiti State on his victory at the poll, said the fact that the election went peacefully and an incumbent was defeated showed that Nigerians cherished democracy, especially when the atmosphere was conducive.

The governor said the political class should imbibe an enduring lesson of the Ekiti political experiment that elections could be conducted devoid of hooliganism and lack of respect for the sanctity of life.

He commended the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC), the police and other security agencies for ensuring that the election was peaceful, free and fair.

According to the governor, the Ekiti election showed that Nigeria had capacity to conduct free and fair elections if the political class showed positive disposition to such.

Governor Ahmed also commended the All Progressives Congress (APC) candidate, Governor Kayode Fayemi for his gallantry in defeat and political maturity in accepting the wish of Ekiti people.

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Fayose gets certificate of return today   Back To Top

From: Daily Sun      Published on: Thursday, June 26, 2014

By CHARLES ADEGBITE, Ado-Ekiti

Ekiti State Governor-elect, Mr Ayodele Fayose, will today receive his certificate of return in last Saturdays election from the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) in Ado Ekiti, Ekiti State capital.

Fayose, who was the candidate of the Peoples Democratic Party ( PDP ) in the June 21 governorship election, defeated the incumbent Governor Kayode Fayemi of the All Progressives Congress ( APC ) in all the 16 local government areas of the state.

Fayoses Chief Press Secretary, Mr. Idowu Adelusi, told Daily Sun that the governor-elect would get his certificate after returning from Abuja, where he had gone since Monday on appreciation visit to the National Working Committee (NWC) members of the PDP and the Presidency for their support and for making the election peaceful, free and fair.

Fayose had gone to Abuja shortly after leaving the Governors Office on Monday after meeting with Fayemi on modalities for setting up a transition committee for the handing over process on October 16.

The election results had been described as the best in history of the country. Governor Fayemi had accepted defeat and taken steps towards making transition to the next administration easy by working with Fayose and the PDP.

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My wife is fond of having men friends, separate us   Back To Top

From: Daily Independent      Published on: Wednesday, June 25, 2014

A 40-year-old man, Mr Femi Olawale, on Wednesday asked an Ado-Ekiti Customary Court to dissolve his three-and half -year-old marriage to his wife, Funke.

Femi is seeking the dissolution of the marriage on the ground of adultery, threat to life, fraud, and lack of care for their children.

He said different men usually paid his wife visits in her office, and that the wife was after money.

She does not cook for me and the children, Olawale told the court.

He claimed that his wife usually threatened him by raining curses on him.

The father of two said there was a time the wife went to beat his sister up in her house.

He added that he once kept some money with her and she refused to give it to him when he needed it.

Funke, 34, however, denied the allegations, saying she had never been promiscous.

She said she always prepared her husbands food likewise her children, contrary to claim by the husband.

She also denied beating her husbands sister, saying she went to find out why she stopped her husband from taking care of the children.

The Courts President, Mrs Olayinka Akomolede, adjourned the case till July 9 for judgment.

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Ekiti election not like June 12- Kokori   Back To Top

From: Punch      Published on: Wednesday, June 25, 2014

by Eniola Akinkuotu

Human rights activist, Chief Frank Kokori, has lauded the recently concluded Ekiti State Governorship election but adds that the election is nothing compared to the June 12, 1993 election which remains the most credible election in Nigerian history.

Kokori, who was the Secretary General of the Nigeria Union of Petroleum and Natural Gas Workers in 1993, said this during the launch of his book titled, Frank Kokori: The Struggle for June 12 in Lagos State on Wednesday.

Kokori, who was incarcerated for protesting the annulment of the 1993 election by General Ibrahim Babangida, said the June 12 election was a better template for the 2015 general elections than the June 21 Ekiti election.

He said, I am an advocate of free and fair elections no matter whose ox is gored. The Ekiti election is a good development in relation to what has been happening in the country. There may be some flaws here and there but comparatively, I think it is ok in terms of transparency especially when the loser has congratulated the winner.

But June 12 was a presidential election and you cant compare it to what happened in 16 local governments in Ekiti. We are talking of 774 local governments so let us not compare. The national elections will be in 36 states. A presidential election in all the wards in the country is a different ball game. What happened in Ekiti election is that the government brought the whole Nigerian security, all the monitoring human right groups and journalists. You cant have that across the country.

When elections are not free and fair, the people will always revolt. But when an election is 80 per cent transparent, people will accept it. We have never scored 100 per cent in any election. The best is June 21, which I give 95 per cent score. Ekiti, I give 65 per cent.

Kokori also lamented the security situation in the country adding that President Goodluck Jonathan was not doing enough to protect lives and property.

Also speaking at the event former Vice President Abubakar Atiku, said there was no better person to tell the story of June 12 than Kokori, whom he called one of the architects of the current democracy, having suffered detention and making little effort to profit from the success of democracy.

It is sad that some of those who did not lift a finger for the attainment of Nigerian democracy are now in charge of the nations affairs, Atiku said, through his representative Mr. Onukaba Adinoyi-Ojo.

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